September 30, 2004
	
	RE BOOK TITLE: The War on Islam

	1. There are many wars being waged on Muslims -
	Afghanistan, Iraq, Palestine, Chechnya,
	Philippines, etc.
	
	2. Each war has a specific purpose and participants
	who may or may not be at war on Islam.

	3. For the most part Muslims are the victim of: the
	military, industrial, congressional complex; global
	corporations; Israel; zionists; evangelical
	Christians; their own leaders; their own community.

	4. For Christian evangelicals, and the Hindus in
	Gujarat, it may be a war on Islam.

	5. For most it is war for resources or markets.
	
	6. In the "global war on terror," for U.S. news 
	media Islam and Muslim appear to be interchangeable 
	- they are not.
	
	7. Muslims are dying in greater numbers than those
	waging war on them.

	8. "The War on Islam" covers many of these issues.
	Whether or not these "wars" are on Islam, for
	resources and markets, for all of the preceding, is
	situation specific.

	9. Following the collapse of the USSR, a search for
	new "enemies" led to the creation of the "Islamic
	fundamentalist" threat, which evolved and became
	the "rogue states," followed by the "axis of evil,"
	and after 9-11, the "war on terror."

	Conclusion: Among the many wars being waged on
	Muslims, there are some who are waging war on
	Islam, others have different motives. Islam is
	denigrated, and Muslims are demonized, to
	rationalize waging war. Overall, there is no clash
	of civilizations, but there are clashes both
	between and within nations. Ultimately, most are a
	clash of values -- greed versus justice.
	
	
	Enver Masud
	
	
	PS: Thirty-eight percent of American Muslims
	believe that the U.S. war on terrorism is really a
	war on Islam, according to a survey released by
	researchers at Georgetown University.  
	-- The Washington Times, October 19, 2004.
		
	Following the collapse of the Soviet Union,
	America's foreign policy establishment focussed on
	Islam as the new threat - see "The Green Peril:
	Creating the Islamic Fundamentalist Threat," by
	Leon T. Hadar.

	
	
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