THE WISDOM FUND: News & Views
December 21, 2007
willthomasonline.net

Report: U.S. Dropped Nuclear Bombs on Afghanistan, Iraq

Conventional bunker-busters could mask the detonation of tactical nuclear bombs

by William Thomas

According to a U.S. Army veteran with extensive boots-on-the-ground connections, the United States Government has dropped five nuclear weapons on Afghanistan and Iraq. . . .

By December 13, 2001 the U.S. Air Force had dropped at least four 17-foot-long "Daisy Cutter" bombs on tunnel complexes and Taliban concentrations in Afghanistan. [globalsecurity.org; commondreams.org]

They also began dropping two-and-a-half-ton GBU-28 "dense metal" penetrators from B-52s and B-1 Stealth bombers. Exploding deep underground, the bomb's explosive energy "coupled" with bedrock under immense pressure from the weight bearing down on it. The resulting seismic shock wave could crush an underground bunker - or the internal organs of anyone caught in the "overpressure" from a blast wave 20-times stronger than the bomb blast itself. [ucsusa.org May/05]

In order to penetrate rock and concrete, each "Great Big Uranium" bomb is shaped like a spear tipped with tons of radioactive Uranium-238 nearly twice as dense as lead. Using nuclear waste left over from making atomic bombs and reactor fuel, the amount of radioactive Depleted Uranium (DU) particles spread by each GBU "dirty bomb" eclipsed any terrorist's fantasy - one-and-a-half metric tons of aerosolized particles capable of causing genetic mutations and death for the next four billion years! [Le Monde March 2002]

The similarities of BLU and GBU detonations to nuclear blasts was not lost on U.S. war planners, who realized that the blast effects and resulting radioactive fallout from conventional bunker-busters could mask the detonation of so-called "low-yield" B61-11 tactical nuclear bombs.

. . . Just as "Little Boy" and "Fat Man" were rushed to the Pacific Theater in time to be tested on the starving Japanese citizenry before the emperor's surrender pleas leaked to the press, the nuclear version of the bunker-busting GBU-28 was rushed to Afghanistan to conduct remote field tests before the Taliban surrendered.

The nuclear version of the GBU-28 bunker buster is the B61-11. When American forces targeted Tora Bora in 2001, there were 150 B61-11s in the U.S. arsenal. Featuring nuclear warheads that could be dialed from 0.3 to 340 kilotons - equivalent of 300 to 340,000 tons of radioactive TNT - these new Earth Penetrating Weapons were, according to atomic scientists, capable of "destroying the deepest and most hardened of underground bunkers, which the conventional warheads are not capable of doing." [Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists May/June 1997; Wired Oct 8/01] . . .

According to U.S. military sources, the first detonation of a nuclear weapon against another country since 1945 took place approximately 11 miles east of Basra, sometime between February 2 and February 5, 1991.

By then, Iraq's former capitol had been declared a "free fire zone" - open to carpet-bombing by high-flying formations of eight-engine B-52s. "Basra is a military town in the true sense," military spokesman General Richard Neal told the press. "The infrastructure, military infrastructure, is closely interwoven within the city of Basra itself."

Though the soon-to-be fired General Neal claimed there were no civilians left in Basra, the city was actually sheltering some 800,000 terrified residents. In direct violation of Article 51 of the Geneva Protocols, which prohibits area bombing, the B-52s commenced saturation grid-bombing of the city. Mixing fuel-air bombs with shrapnel-spraying cluster bombs, the bombers leveled entire city blocks, the Los Angeles Times reported, leaving "bomb craters the size of football fields, and an untold number of casualties." [Washington Post Feb 2/91; Los Angeles Times Feb 5/91]

With the city of Basra resounding to gigantic explosions, and engulfed in "a hellish nighttime of fires and smoke so dense that witnesses say the sun hasn't been clearly visible for several days at a time," a 5-kiloton GB-400 nuclear bomb exploding 11 miles away under the desert attracted no notice. [deoxy.org; Los Angeles Times Feb 5/91] . . .

According to Hank, under the cover of massive DU-tipped bombs that raised dirty mushroom clouds in thunderous explosions that rained radioactive dust over Jalalabad and nearby villages, the first nuclear bombs dropped since Basra in 1991 were detonated by American forces in Afghanistan beginning in March 2002. Before their field tests were concluded, United States forces would explode four 5-kiloton GBU-400 nuclear bombs in Tora Bora and other mountainous regions of Afghanistan. . . .

FULL TEXT



Souad N. Al-Azzawi, "Depleted Uranium Radioactive Contamination In Iraq: An Overview," Global Research, August 31, 2006

[On April 27, 1937, in the midst of the Spanish Civil War (a prelude to World War II), the planes of the German Condor Legion attacked the ancient Basque town of Guernica. They came in waves, first carpet bombing, then dropping thermite incendiaries. It was a market day and there may have been as many as 7,000-10,000 people, including refugees, in the town which was largely destroyed in the ensuing fire storm. More than 1,600 people may have died there (though some estimates are lower). The Germans reputedly dropped about 50 tons or 100,000 pounds of explosives on the town. In the seven decades between those two 100,000 figures lies a sad history of our age.

Arab Jabour, the Sunni farming community about 10 miles south of the Iraqi capital that was the target of the latest 100,000-pound barrage has recently been largely off-limits to American troops and their Iraqi allies. The American military now refers generically to all Sunni insurgents who resist them as "al Qaeda," so in situations like this it's hard to tell exactly who has held this territory.

At Guernica, as in Arab Jabour 71 years later, no reporters were present when the explosives rained down.--Tom Engelhardt, " Normalizing Air War from Guernica to Arab Jabour," Global Research, August 31, 2006]

[ . . . the United States hit Iraqi targets with more than 970 radioactive bombs and missiles. . . .

More than 15 years later, the dire health consequences of our first radioactive bombing campaign in this region are coming into focus. Since 1990, the incidence rate of leukemia in Iraq has increased over 600 percent. . . .

Bombed-out industrial plants and factories have polluted groundwater.

. . . the current Iraq war could destroy what's left of the Mesopotamian marshes on the lower Tigris and Euphrates rivers.--Jeffrey St. Clair and Joshua Frank, "Half Life of a Toxic War - Iraq's Wrecked Environment," counterpunch.org, May 1, 2009]

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